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01Oct 20

Summer 2020 Issue – The 1940 Ricketts-Steinbeck Sea of Cortez Expedition

Cover of the Summer 2020 issue of the Journal of the SouthwestJohn Steinbeck on the flying bridge of the Western FlyerJSW’s summer 2020 issue is finally out!  Guest edited by Rick Brusca, Executive Director, Emeritus, of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, the title of this gorgeous special volume is, “The 1940 Ricketts-Steinbeck Sea of Cortez Expedition: An 80-year Retrospective.” Eight decades ago, John Steinbeck and marine biologist Ed Ricketts set sail aboard the Western Flyer from Monterey Bay, California, to explore the Sea of Cortez, leading to Steinbeck’s 1951 publication, The Log from the Sea of Cortez. As Brusca points out in his lovely introduction, “a sublime attribute of this voyage and the book it spawned was the seamless blending of art, science, and philosophy.”  The contributors to this special issue revisit, add to, and in many ways re-interpret the expedition, bringing new details to light, offering fresh interpretations, and showing us how so much of what the two explorers accomplished lives on in the ways we understand the Sea of Cortez today.  All of us at JSW are deeply grateful to Rick for so capably bringing this issue together, to each of the authors for their wonderful contributions, and to the Western Flyer Foundation, whose generous gift helped bring it all to fruition.  Cheers!

For a full copy of this or any other issue of the Journal of the Southwest, please visit our revamped subscription page or send an email to Lupita Cruz: lmaldona@email.arizona.edu

20Jul 20

Spring 2020 Issue – Joe Wilder’s Farewell

Journal of the Southwest is pleased to announce the release of its Spring 2020 issue, Cover Spring 2020 issue of the Journal of the Southwestarriving a bit later tCarleton and Judith Wilder with their baby on the south-facing cabin porch in Saguaro National Monument, 1938–1939han usual.  In it is a farewell by JSW’s founding editor, Dr. Joseph C. Wilder, who stepped down at the end of June.  We will miss Dr. Wilder hugely and are profoundly grateful for his creative and steady direction for the past three decades.  Archaeologist Aaron Wright’s essay, “The Stones of Taliesin West: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Petroglyphs of Paradise Valley,’ is an in-depth exploration of a little-known aspect of the Phoenix home of the famous urban planner and architect.

This issue also includes a history of food in the Mexico-U.S. borderlands, a look at cyberpunk and its ties to Chicano culture, and an edited version of Captain Augustus G. Tassin’s 1877 “Account of Natural Conditions and Historical Settlements on the Lower Colorado River.”  Finally, Spring 2020 brings us an edited diary (“A Saguaro Diary”) kept by Joe Wilder’s mother, Judith, from 1938 to 1939, when she and her husband Carleton moved with their young family to a small cabin in Saguaro National Monument East.  Carleton had landed a seasonal ranger post in the monument.  Accompanying the edited diary is a lovely reflection by Judith’s granddaughter, Elizabeth, called “Desert Timepiece.”  We hope you enjoy reading this issue half as much as we have enjoyed putting it together! 

For a full copy of this or any other issue of the Journal of the Southwest, please visit our subscription page or send an email to Lupita Cruz: lmaldona@email.arizona.edu

26Feb 20

Winter 2019 Issue is out!

Yaqui Indian chiefs with General Obregón’s army

Journal of the Southwest is pleased to announce the (somewhat belated) publication of its Winter 2019 issue (volume 61, number 4).
Winter 2019 covers significant new intellectual ground on a range of themes, from analysis of education reforms during the era of the Indian New Deal (1933-1945) to an exploration of citizenship, race, and violence in 19th-century New Mexico.  As always, we are grateful to our contributors for this excellent issue, and we also thank JSW’s many dedicated readers.  JSW welcomes your views and opinions, and we are always open to creative ideas for upcoming issues.  Cheers!

For a full copy of this or any other issue of the Journal of the Southwest, please visit our subscription page or send an email to Lupita Cruz: lmaldona@email.arizona.edu

17Dec 19

Laura Kerman, O’Odham potter

Laura Kerman JSW Autumn 2019Journal of the Southwest is pleased to announce the publication of its Autumn 2019 issue (Volume 61, Number 3)!  This issue is larger than most, covering a broad range of topics, from a critical reading of Ed Abbey’s classic, Desert Solitaire, and an exploration of canal and road development in Phoenix, to an essay on Aldo Leopold’s life and work in mountains ranges across the Southwest.  Also included are essays on violence in the Mexico-US border region during the nineteenth century; a look at Mary E.J. Colter and the arts and crafts movement; and a piece that uses a postcolonial psychoanalytic frame to understand US imperialism during the nineteenth century and policies of Indian removal through the lens of Helen Hunt Jackson’s book, Ramona.  We are particularly thrilled to include Karen Louise Reichhardt’s oral history and memoir of O’Odham potter, the late Laura Kerman.  Enjoy!

For a full copy of this or any other issue of the Journal of the Southwest, please visit our subscription page or send an email to Lupita Cruz: lmaldona@email.arizona.edu

 

23Sep 19

Roland L. Ives, Loyal Loner

JSW is pleased to announce the publication of its Summer 2019 issue (Volume 61, Number 2) — “Loyal Loner: The Life of Ronald L. Ives, Southwest Geographer” — written by Tucson-based author and intrepid Sonoran Desert explorer, Bill Broyles. A geologist and geographer, Ives explored, researched, and wrote about the Pinacate region of Northern Sonora, where, among other things, he created a cartography of water holes in that driest of dry parts of the Sonoran Desert.  He was also well known for his archival sleuthing on the topic of Spanish exploration in the Southwest.

Take a look at Bill’s intro here. For a full copy of this or any other issue of the Journal of the Southwest, please visit our subscription page or send an email to Lupita Cruz: lmaldona@email.arizona.edu

 

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